Pollys engine bling

1.Cover any expensive looking electrical bits with clingfilm.
2.Spray on Autoglym Engine and Machine Cleaner.
3.Give the grubby bit a good brush with a suitable stiff bristled brush.
4.Spray down with hose.
5.Remove cling film and spray all over engine bay with AutoGlym rubber and vinyl care while bay is still wet.
6.Shut bonnet and leave for an hour or so to dry.
7.Start engine and go for a spin and let engine reach full operating temp. Engine might feel a bit rough until warmed up.

Autoglym Vinyl & Rubber cleaner on yes vinyl & rubber. Works on black plastic as well. It lasts and does not go grey.

Exposed steel use fine wire wool or chrome polish.

The manilfold heat shield polishes up nicely.

Make the effort to get at all the difficult to access bodywork under the bonnet. Dirt and grime gathers in the corners which is very noticable if you have a light coloured car.

Reist blinging everything, or worse still just the one item like a chrome cam cover. It sticks out a mile & looks odd unless you have other co-ordinated blinging in the bay.

Just clean and polished for the professional and well engineered look.
You could do with a polished striker plate in the engine bay (above the radiator void) Possibe next project? Wink

Not sure what you mean by a striker plate, can you show me? You know that Heath Robinson contraption in the mk1 for tightening the belts up that looks horrible, well I have had it all off to day to clean it up a bit. Here is a pic.



And another



This was a lid from a Stainless Steel sugar tin from Boyes stores £ 1.97
 

 This is what I have been doing today. Started at the nearside of engine and removed all the metal brackets and cleaned and resprayed them. Cleaned and polished all associated nuts and bolts. Cleaned and polished that part of the engine bay bodywork that you can’t normally get to. Polished and painted the strut bar bracket. Polished again the air intake at the offside side of the engine. Can you see what I have done to the strut brace bracket?


when you do this how to you clean off all the gunk and then get such a high finish on the polish ? also when you paint parts do you spray or brush and what paint and colour do you use ?



This is how I approached the job of smartening up the engine bay and all areas under the bonnet, without going to the trouble of removing the engine and everything under the bonnet, to respray all the panels.
As I understand it some people, more able shall I say than myself, do go to the trouble of removing everything.
I only have a normal garage to work in, as do most people I assume, so this is mainly intended for them.
If it is well received I will add further updates to what I do and how.

My logic is that if the part can be removed from the engine bay area, then remove it, as it is easier to work on the part more comfortably.
When removing some of the parts to clean and repaint etc I take the opportunity to clean and polish the panels as much as I can with MMM fine polishing cream.

Safety Note: You should wear a mask so that you don’t breath in any of the aluminium dust.

As the cam cover is possibly the hardest and dirtiest job to do, but possibly the most rewarding, I decided to do this as my first task.
First thing to do is to order a new cam cover gasket.
Remove the cam cover and clean the inside of oil and plug any holes etc with pieces of cloth.
If you clean it properly you can use masking tape to cover the holes etc.
As the cover is a casting it is quite rough and bearing in mind that to get a highly polished component you start with course wet & dry paper and finish with very fine before the final high gloss finish is obtained.
I use a joiners cork sanding block and P320 wet & dry emery paper, dry not with water, (you could use water if you prefer) to start with.
I also use a Dremel type tool with fine grade small sanding bobbins and fine grade discs to get into the difficult corners as it is these difficult places that make a cam cover stand out against the rest you come across. If you decide to use flap wheels in a drill you will soon wish you hadn’t as they leave quite deep scratches that take a lot of removing.
You need to remove all the roughness off the casting with P320 w & d then do it all again using P800, then again using P1000 and yet again with P1500 grades w & d.
Each time you are removing the scratches from the previous courser paper.
The finer grades of paper you use, the easier it will to get the high polish on
I have a woodturning lathe that gets used for everything other than woodturning so I have it equipped to take buffing wheels that I use to polish anything metal and in some cases plastic & rubber.
You can buy buffing wheels and the compounds for polishing that will fit into an electric drill, it is this final buffing with these wheels and compounds that get the finish you are looking for.
I buy mine from
http://www.thepolishingshop.biz/.
I use four different buffing wheels and three different grades of compounds.

Steel components are tackled in the same way as aluminium, the slight difference being that I spray bright metal parts with 3 coats of clear lacquer to prevent them rusting or discolouring.

Painted parts are degreased using a kitchen washing up brush with the stiff bristles and, cellulose thinners in a kitchen type nylon-mixing bowl.
Clean any loose paint off with P320 w & d then degrease again.
Dry the part off with a clean cloth.
I warm the part up, a little, in front of a blower fan heater I have in the garage then give the piece three separate coats of primer. (After giving the paint can a good 2 min shake) Leave for 10 minutes between each coat.
Apply three coats of topcoat paint and leave for about 10 minutes between each coat.
Do the same again with the clear lacquer.
Note that when you spray your first coat of primer on and you notice small pin pricks of paint or what looks like small circular holes where the paint hasn’t taken it is because the part you are spraying is still not clean so wash it all off again in the thinners and wipe dry with a CLEAN cloth and try spraying again.
All the heads of the bolts and the nuts are cleaned first with a stainless steel wire brush in the Dremel tool and then polished with the three grades of buffing wheels and compounds.

This is a picture of my lathe and the buffing wheels.


The spray paint primer I use is SIMONIZ Cellulose White Spray Primer. (This is a very smooth primer).
The top colour coat I use is SIMONIZ 5 Wheel Silver Spray Paint.
The Lacquer I use is SIMONIZ Clear Lacquer Spray.
The Compounds I use with the buffing wheels are Grey, Green and blue in this order using different grades of buffing wheels.

I may, another day explain how I ended up getting a highly polished finish on the air intake tubes etc, and what I do about some alloy parts I don't want to take off to polish, yet
this is excellant information and would make a good article in stht as well Very Happy how do you decide what things to spray and what to polish or is it just personal preference ?


If it is a painted bracket type of thing and it will come off, it is going to get repainted.
The same applies to aluminium, steel and rubber type products, they are going to get polished.

_________________
Powdercoating can be done fairly cheaply these days. The various brackets that can be found around the engine bay can be done to great effect, ive done the brackets for the fusebox/ diagnostic conector, throttle cable bracket, pulleys, strut brace and slam panel. Ive allways liked to use autoglym vinyl and rubber care but have also been reccomended the 303 stuff so i might give that a try. I am also trying out the Mothers products that have had good reviews mainly the Mag and Ally polish and the billet polish for polishing alluminium parts such as the intake manifold. Small chips in the engine bay paint i repair with Mazda touch up paint.Ive also replaced most of the engine bay nuts and bolts with stainless items.
Here's what we look like now
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y213/jayroadster/SV203087.jpg


Very nice, where did you get your stainless steel nut and bolts from, and were they the same shape, ie were they flared at the point you would normally put a washer, as the original ones?

Like these, but nuts and bolts
They where from ebay and came packed and marked specifically for the five. No they dont have flanged nuts they use a washer instead. Here's what i got
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y213/jayroadster/SV202591.jpg

and another shot of the bay. I used a can of red spray paint to do the caps ontop of the suspension struts as well as the expansion cap and dip stick

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y213/jayroadster/SV203104.jpg
Powdercoating can be done fairly cheaply these days. The various brackets that can be found around the engine bay can be done to great effect, ive done the brackets for the fusebox/ diagnostic conector, throttle cable bracket, pulleys, strut brace and slam panel. Ive allways liked to use autoglym vinyl and rubber care but have also been reccomended the 303 stuff so i might give that a try. I am also trying out the Mothers products that have had good reviews mainly the Mag and Ally polish and the billet polish for polishing alluminium parts such as the intake manifold. Small chips in the engine bay paint i repair with Mazda touch up paint.Ive also replaced most of the engine bay nuts and bolts with stainless items.
Here's what we look like now
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y213/jayroadster/SV203087.jpg


Unfortunately there isn't anywhere near to me that does powder coating but, out of interest how much does it cost to get the brackets on the engine bay near side wing done. Do you have to clean all the rust etc off before you send them for powder coating
The powdercoater shot blast and powdercoated them all for £20 IIRC including the coil pack bracket and throttle pulley

Here’s two more pictures of some more bits that I have cleaned and polished etc




my engine bay was fithy never been cleaned i spayed it with tfr (traffic film remover) left it a couple of mins and rinsed

oh yeah i covered the electrics


can you show where exactly you covered and how ? did you just rinse using a hosepipe or power washer ? where did you get the tfr


I have used a hosepipe but turned the spray effect down so you can control where the water goes.
The last time I cleaned some of the engine bay I used an empty spray bottle, like you get kitchen cleaner in such as Mr Muscle, filled with water, it is surprising how easy it is to rinse the gunge off using one of these.

if i post or send a pic of my svt engine can some show me exactly where i shoudl cover in foil etc to protect from the cleaner and water ?

also pollyana what do you use on yoru hoses and pipes to get such a great finish on them ?
when you remove bits from the engine to polish up etc how do you know what tightness thinks need to be set to ?


To answer your first question would take about as long as my other posts, must say it is not easy.
The three main ones, the air cleaner intake, and the two joined trunking pieces from the air flow meter to the intake manifold don't appear to be made from exactly the same material.
The trunking from the air flow meter polishes up very well. the air flow meter intake polishes not so well and the trunking to the intake manifold is worse still.
I spent hours on the last item mentioned without a great deal of improvement.
The 90 deg bend rubber pipe just to the right of the ISC valve which is quite soft, polished the quickest and easiest.

Answer to the second question is, 50 years of experience man & boy.


 
I also have an ebay polishing kit and they work.



Can you post a link to the kit you bought
I bought it a while ago.

it came with 3 different sisal mops and 3 cutting polishes ( Grey, Green and Blue) , a few attachments to get into the hard to reach areas and instructions.

I bought somthing very similar to this:


http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/METAL-POLISHING-KIT-FOR-ALL-METALS-6-MOPS-37_W0QQitemZ150132723698QQihZ005QQcategoryZ25644QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

But if you want soem more bits and pieces just do a search on ‘metal polishing kit’ and take your pick.

And be prepared to spend hours rubbing down metal bits!

Any more updates?

That inlet manifold is begging to be polished!

I just got hold of a spare thermostat housing as its one of the bits I have never got done.

I have been wet and drying it for about half an hour for the past few evenings and have managed to get most of the 'grain' out.

I also have an ebay polishing kit and they work.

I will be polishing once I am happy it is smooth enough and then it will be polished with three different polished and sissle mops on a drill attachment.


With regards to your thermostat housing, you may be surprised to see when it is polished up that it is better than the cam cover, I think it is because it is made of a better alloy than the cam cover.
I have been working on my engine bay cleaning and polishing the painted panels etc for about 2 weeks now and it's looking better.
I will post some more pictures later today, when I get my camera back, with a few words of what and how I have tackled some of the work done.

Just in case some of you lads & lasses don't know much about polishing with polishing mops, here is a couple of good tips for you.
The mops will tend to get clogged up with compound and aluminium and will not perform as well as when they are new so, what you should do is to clean them with the mops rotating at speed using a Stainless Steel wire brush against the outside diameter of the wheel until it is as nice and clean as when you bought it.
If you are using your polishing mops in an electric drill, it would if you haven't already done so, be advised to buy a stand to hold the drill in so you can present the the piece being polished, up to the mop as opposed to the other way round.
You will be able to get more pressure onto the piece being polished and it is safer this way too.

Do not mean to hijack your thread but just finished the Thermostat housing. Took about 20 mins. heres the results:





Next i'm going to attempt the thingy ma bobby near the belts that you did earlier in the thread.

By the way. this is what my engine bay looks like in its current form:

 Here we go again. I have spent all this week polishing and touching up with paint on the right hand side of the engine bay.

This is a picture of the new bracket I made for the front of the air cleaner to replace the original one.



This picture shows where it is to be fitted with new cap nuts.



A better picture of the bracket.



Some of the places I have fitted cap nuts.



And another.



When I took the bracket off to polish the edges and repaint it I noticed that the bolt hole in the bracket arrowed, was elongated by about 3mm so, all polishing had to stop to get this sorted out.
I made a mild steel plug to fit the hole and then had it welded up by my friend Tony who also redrilled it to the correct size then, I got back to polishing it and painting it.
I hadn't noticed any problems associated with the hole being worn but thought it was prudent to get it fixed while I had it off the car.



The body of the Air Cleaner was cleaned up by removing it from the engine and cleaning it with hand cleaning gel and a paint brush and then again with washing up liquid in a bowl of hot water. It has come up like new.



Last but not least this is a picture of two small tools I made to help me to polish the Flange Nuts and the Flange Bolts as my fingers are too short and stubby to hold small items to polish up.


The next job I will be working on is the two fans and the area around them. I am taking the three air horns off to replace them with something more original and smaller.
I used to have an MG 1500 midget and I really liked the horn on that but can't remember what it was like apart from the great sound it made so, if anyone can help me on this I would be most grateful.

The last and final job will be the polishing of the intake manifold but, that will be a winter time job as I don't want the car off the road for the amount of time it will take to polish that up.
Autoglym Vinyl & Rubber cleaner on yes vinyl & rubber. Works on black plastic as well. It lasts and does not go grey.

Exposed steel use fine wire wool or chrome polish.

The manilfold heat shield polishes up nicely.

Make the effort to get at all the difficult to access bodywork under the bonnet. Dirt and grime gathers in the corners which is very noticable if you have a light coloured car.

Reist blinging everything, or worse still just the one item like a chrome cam cover. It sticks out a mile & looks odd unless you have other co-ordinated blinging in the bay.

Just clean and polished for the professional and well engineered look.


In your remark about resisting bling do you mean, not fitting all the after market bits that supposedly increase perfomance. I am cleaning as much as possible and also polishing as much as possible but at the same time keeping the engine bay as near to what it was like when new, only a little better.
As part of my engine bay clean up, I decided to smarten up the headlamp shields by repainting with the special plastic primer and matt black spray paint.
While refitting them I noticed that there is a small gap, in the same position, on both the left and right hand side shields, on the outboard sides.
Does anyone know if this is normal and if so what is it like this for?
The part I am speaking about is the arrowed part in the picture.


 



Does anyone know if this is normal and if so what is it like this for?
The part I am speaking about is the arrowed part in the picture.


I recently took my light cover off to paint, and it has the same gap, so I wouldn't worry too much



just to be a bit different to everyone else

 

Not sure what you mean by a striker plate, can you show me?


I've probably got the name wrong, it's one of these things from the front between the nose and the radiator. Meant to channel air into the radiator I believe, but would look very shiny Very Happy

Just finished this one made from stainless steel.





Polished and Fitted on top of rubber tap washers to stop any rattles of metal on metal.