WiFi Extenders

Completely none car related. Has anyone any experience of Wi Fi extenders. and which is the best for a 3 story house.
TIA
Bob

TP Link, Netgear or BT units are pretty good, the BT mesh system is pretty effective.

It depends if you have 2.4 or 5Ghz capability on your router. 5Ghz doesn’t reach as far but offers greater bandwidth. 11ac is mainstream now, 11ax is the new faster standard. Only a few phones and laptops have 11ax WiFi.

If you have a BT hub, use their mesh system for compatibility.

Hope this helps.

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I have a solid old house with all brick internal walls. The Internet comes in at one end of the house and it has always been a challenge getting decent wifi coverage at the other… We tried one of those wifi extenders that uses the internal electrical system, but as there are lots of different circuits, it did not work. We have also tried a BT wifi extender and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t - no real reason why it sometimes drops out that I am aware of. I believe that the BT internet hub we got from BT is not the greatest as far as wifi transmitting is concerned and have been advised to get a new one, but I have not got around to it…

Mike - what is the “BT mesh system” and where would you get one? I have had the previous systems from the local PC world - but they are not particularly helpful.

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It all depends on what you want to do with it!

If you need ultimate WiFi bandwidth, then as Mike-P says, the latest system 802-11ax WiFi is required, both on the hub and the devices connecting to it.

Failing that, then 802-11ac (from 2014) is usually good enough for most things (phones, laptops, etc) and most modern devices will connect to it. And if the WiFi source is up near the ceiling of the middle floor in the centre of a squarish three story house it should reach all three floors. But steel framing and RSJs can cause dead spot problems.

For anyone who is not tech-savvy and wants a quick and simple solution, then the 802-11ac BT SmartHub 2 (and its optional ‘mesh’ extender pucks) that comes with the new FTTC (Fibre To The Cabinet) Broadband package from BT is a good way to go. However, I chose not…

Why not? It’s partly because all our high speed networking is via Ethernet and not WiFi which is of secondary importance. For others WiFi is of prime importance. Horses for courses.

Other reasons.
Although I’m still on 802-11n (from 2009) with my old TP-Link Gigabit router, it works flawlessly and has better reach than the brand new cooking hot (60C in a 20C room) BT SmartHub 2 they foisted on me with the fibre upgrade. The TP Link offers more options on setting security, and uses much less power (only 5C temp rise). The BT Hub was also very unfriendly when trying to configure it and my local network to be as secure as the TP-Link!

So I quickly gave up on the BT Hub and bought a DrayTek Vigor (only 6C temp rise) to be a VDSL to Ethernet bridge to allow my old router to still handle the admin and talk to the outside world. This combination allows two lots of NAT (Network Address Translation) and full control of VPN (Virtual Private Network) etc as well.

I have some metalwork in the house which blocks the WiFi between the old and ‘new’ halves, so the upstairs ring-main also carries a TP-Link extender with two Ethernet sockets and a WiFi node. It is not the fastest, but good enough. I put that node on a different password with less internal network access privilege since it was closer to the main road and any potential snoopers. Some of these extenders can also interfere with the incoming VDSL. The assorted slightly slower ones I’ve tried like this one don’t.

When using such a network extender on a ring main it can work very well, but only if the wiring is in good shape with no iffy connections in any of the ring sockets, and also if the extender signal is not expected to pass through the windings in an MCB (Miniature Circuit Breaker) or RCCB (Residual Current Circuit Breaker). So if you try two floors above each other on two different rings with individual MCBs, but driven by the input device on one ring then the output device will probably not work on the other ring.

A final annoyance. On my cameras, I noticed passers-by frequently stopping to use the BT Hub ‘hot spot’ during the two days it was in action, and only during these two days. This is now not possible, and I have full bandwidth all the time without any leeches robbing it, and best of all no smokers lurking by my side gate.

There are 2 types of mesh discs from BT

https://shop.bt.com/learnmore/bt-branded-products-and-services/bt-whole-home-wi-fi/

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Brilliant info thanks all

A final annoyance. On my cameras, I noticed passers-by frequently stopping to use the BT Hub [‘hot spot’] during the two days it was in action, and only during these two days. This is now not possible, and I have full bandwidth all the time without any leeches robbing it, and best of all no smokers lurking by my side gate.

From the BT Website . . . .

Question If other people connect via my Hub, does this slow down the internet for me?

Answer Most people use only a very small percentage (2-10%) of the bandwidth they have available, so this is unlikely. However, if you do need more of your bandwidth at any time, you’ll always be prioritised over the BT Wi-fi user.

That’s one reason I don’t use the BT Homehub, I’m not letting anyone get to my 900Mbps!

It was the six builders fiddling with their phones and all smoking that irked me, because unusually the wind was from the East and their smoke was blowing through the hedge into our kitchen window.

That’s how I found out what was going on. By then the DrayTek was already on its way.

Remove the hotspot, remove the annoyance. The simplest plans work the best.

After some research and balance against cost I bought the TPlink AC1750, gives great signal past the bottom of my garden now.

TP-Link AC1750 Universal Dual… https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B013SYHHI2?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share