Timepieces - What's on your Wrist or in your Pocket?

Many of us like a watch. I’ve not worn one for a few years, but today my Accurist Solar 120 arrived… Modest but nice and I really like it. :slight_smile: What do you have on your wrist…?
Or maybe it’s in your pocket…!

Rob

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Nothing since the second hand of my Thai-Chinese watch fell off.

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Mostly Seiko these days. The yellow one is an Accurist that my wife bought me and I must have that 20+ years now. The one to the right is a Skagen Titanium which was my every day one but needs a battery. The six in the box are all Seiko and I now wear one watch a week. I did have an Omega Seamaster, beautiful watch but ended up only wearing it about three days a year so sold it as I was too precious about it.

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Casio G-Shock GW-M5610-1ER.

I have a couple of nice dress watches but my hobby is woodturning and I need something that is impervious to the bangs and vibration of the workshop.

This thing is built like the proverbial brick outhouse, it updates itself daily from the Rugby time signal so it’s accurate to milliseconds, and is solar powered so no winding or batteries.

I’ve had it for years, it’s never off my wrist, and the only hassle has been a worn-out strap. It takes a LOT of punishment.

Four alarms, perpetual calendar, countdown timer, world clock, two time zones, stopwatch, water resistant to 20bar and most importantly big old numbers that are easy on this old-timer’s eyes. It’ll see me out.

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Saved for this with ciggy money when I quit .
JA McCabe.
Bit different from the run of mill budget watch.
Historic company.
image

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Seiko Samurai 1st generation I also have the new generation, but really don’t like the triangular hour hand

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A Raymond Weil chronograph I bought in 2000 from earnings for being on call over the Millennium weekend. Also have a Tissot and couple of cheap ones too.

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This, for the last four decades :grin:

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This, wanted a mechanical automatic watch (smooth second hand sweep), about 12 years old now and in good working order, on to the 4th strap I think.

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What a splendid topic. These days it’s mostly either my Seiko SKX031, or my Vostok Amphibian 1961 SE.


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I see the time there… At the third stroke it will be one freckle past hair…! :joy:

Rob

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These two Seikos are more in the draw as one is a non-runner and the other will run for a bit…!
Probably need servicing but not sure they’re worth it…

Rob

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A service is about £100 I have just have mine done after wearing it 15 years.

Sedna gold Omega Speedmaster, had many nice watches over the years, Zenith, Rolex, Omega, but this is the only one I have at the moment, a 60th birthday present from my wife in February 22.

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This is my little collection. Worn weeks about in turn. I have a crummy Casio too but only wear it when I’m doing very mucky work away from home.

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My favourite.

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Sekonda. £20 from Woolworths in Oxford in 1978 when I realised I needed a stopwatch for my exams at the end of my first year at uni. It’s got through a few batteries since then.

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My watch is utterly boring and reliable. I just change the battery every few years.

However, my grandfather’s “very expensive watch” has a story. He bought it new when the model first came out, and for the next decade it spent most of its time back at the manufacturers being “serviced” under warranty because its time keeping was so bad. He even had to tell them if he took it off at night, so they could adjust the compensation etc (really?)

I inherited it when he died in 1962 and took it into school. My physics master took one quick glance, shot into the equipment store at great speed ,and returned with a Geiger counter which buzzed away merrily when put close up. The watch face was the original with radioactive hands and numbers.

It was dangerously above minimum safe dosage, even in those days! It has lived in a tin box ever since.

My grandfather died of a brain tumour in his left temple. Did the watch kill him? Nobody knows, and born in 1878 he did have a good innings, so no further investigation.

The watch is now so old the luminosity has faded to nothing, however it is all original, bar the strap. I took it to a watch repairer just before lock-down to see if it was worth cleaning up and putting a new crystal on it and fixing the winder. No, even in perfect nick this ancient stainless steel Rolex Oyster Perpetual Officially Certified Chronometer is not even worth the cost of a service and a new strap. Oh well.

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You could sell one as is…who knows ££? and use it towards getting your favourite serviced I guess.
Listen to me eh? I canny chuck anything.

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